on by in Advertising, Interviews, News, Research

Hulu Value Proposition_8.20.15

Monday, September 28th


Cross Screen Summit

Why Does Context Matter? Because Context Matters!

Context has always been a marketers’ best friend. Should it continue to be? With audience-based buying gaining traction across screens – what role does content relevancy play in today’s cross-screen world? Join a conversation with marketers and publishers to hear what they think matters

Moderator: Pooja Midha (SVP, Digital Ad Sales and Operations, ABC)


  • Peter Naylor (SVP, Advertising Sales, Hulu)
  • Eric Johnson (EVP, Global Multimedia Sales, ESPN)
  • Dave O’Connor (Executive Producer, Radical Media)
  • John Partilla (CEO, Olson)
  • Jason Lopatecki (CSO, TubeMogul)


Tuesday, September 29th



Fireside Chat

  • Seth Meyers (Co-Creator of Hulu Original, The Awesomes)
  • Mike Hopkins (CEO, Hulu)
  • Randall Rothenberg (President & CEO, Interactive Advertising Bureau)


Tuesday, September 29th


Direct to Consumer, OTT, and the Future of Video Entertainment

The long-predicted OTT and D2C world has arrived. While 2015 has been a year of expansion and experimentation, with an increasingly crowded marketplace characterized by players jockeying for position, where will the industry go from here? Will 2016 be the year of rationalization and consolidation, separating the few from the many? Amidst this frenzy of activity, all participants in the value chain – pure- play OTT players, broadcasters, telcos, content companies, and advertisers – are facing more questions than answers.


  • Peter Naylor (SVP, Advertising Sales, Hulu)
  • Christopher Vollmer (Partner, Strategy, PwC member firm)
  • Kenny Gersh (EVP, Business, MLB Advanced Media)
  • Frank Besterio (VP, Business Development & Partnerships for Video, AOL)


Wednesday, September 30th


OMMA Programmatic Video

Deja Vu All Over Again: The Search for Quality Inventory

Seems like we’ve been here before. Media buyers want access to more quality inventory in the exchanges. Publishers remain reticent to see their coveted and higher priced  video space get commoditized by automation and bidding dynamics. So what is the state of the video inventory in programmatic channels? Has the private exchange economy kicked in here at scale yet to assuage both sides? Have media buyers adjusted their definition of “premium” video inventory? What is the “quality” in programmatic video, and how are media buyers finding what they need?

Moderator: Brian Nadres (Director of Programmatic Media, The Media Kitchen)


  • Doug Fleming (Director, Programmatic Sales, Hulu)
  • Harvin Furman (SVP, Group Director, Digital Acceleration, Starcom USA)
  • Adam Kasper (Chief Media Officer, Havas Media)
  • Bryan Noguchi (SVP, Media Director, R2C Group)
  • Carrie Seifer (President, Digital Data & Technology, Mediavest)


Thursday, October 1st


Cablefax TV Innovation Summit

OTT, TVE and Skinny Bundles: Can’t We All Just Get Along?

It just doesn’t seem fair. The industry spent decades building the current TV ecosystem in all its big bundle glory, and now OTT players and “skinny bundlers” are ruining the party for everyone. Or are they? For the first time, smart people who used to dismiss a-la-carte as economically unsustainable are starting to wonder whether the same economic rules apply anymore.

We’ll explore how the industry’s TV Everywhere effort to authenticate content can co-exist in a world in which consumers can customize their programming mix like never before. Are some cable networks doomed in this environment? Are others poised for greatness? And when consumers add up all the costs of those standalone and skinny content options, will they end up happy or nostalgic for those days of old? We’ll hit this one from every angle as we take a new look at this uncertain environment.


We’ll examine how OTT and TVE fit together in the new TV ecosystem. How do consumers view the differences between a-la-carte OTT options vs. the authenticated experience offered by TVE? And how can the industry do a better job ensuring that consumers understand how to manage all of their content choices—all while supporting the ultimate goal of monetizing content creation and distribution.


  • Jim Galley, (Distribution & Strategic Partnerships, Hulu)
  • Dwayne Benefield (VP, Playstation VUE, Sony)
  • Tom Mohler (CEO, Olympusat Holdings)
  • Robyn Polashuk (Managing Partner, Covington & Burling)
  • Evan Silverman (SVP, Digital Media, A&E Networks)


Thursday, October 1st


Cablefax TV Innovation Summit

Programmatic Static: Advertising, Marketing and Monetization in a Digital World

You’ve told people that you understand programmatic advertising. Heck, you’ve even sounded pretty convincing. But now it’s time to pull back the veil and truly understand how automated buying changes the advertising and marketing landscape. How does programmatic fuse digital and linear targeting? Who are the big technology and strategic players? And how can content owners and distributors rise above a “set it and forget it” mentality that risks leaving money and viewers on the table?

We’ll explore new ways that programmers and operators are using programmatic to hone overall marketing strategies, super-serve the right ads in the right way and ultimately beat the competition. We’ll also dissect how programmatic buying intersects with other tried-and-true advertising and marketing methodologies. Programmatic is a huge part of the future for the entire industry, and this session will wash away the confusion and prepare you for success.

Moderator: Barry Frey (President & CEO, Digital Place Based Advertising Association)


  • Doug Fleming (Director, Programmatic Sales, Hulu)
  • Seth Goren (SVP, Media Strategy and Analytics, Discovery Communications)
  • James Shears (GM, Addressable and Programmatic, DISH Media Sales)
  • Jamie Weissenborn (Chief Revenue Officer, Machinima)


Thursday, October 1st


ANA Connected TV/OTT Members Only Conference presented by BrightLine

ComScore & Hulu: Reaching Millennials Across Platforms

Audiences of video streaming services have been rapidly shifting away from desktops and moving to connected or OTT devices such as gaming consoles, Roku and smart TVs to watch non-linear video. What has been great for consumers, however, has proven to be a challenge for the media industry in terms of measuring these audiences across multiple platforms. To solve this problem, Hulu partnered with comScore to measure their audience to discover where the highly coveted audience of the future, Millennials, is consuming content. In this session, Hulu and comScore will uncover rich insights on how Millennials are utilizing multiple platforms and how marketers can capitalize on this opportunity.


  • Justin Fromm (Director, Advertising Research, Hulu)
  • David Shiffman (SVP, Marketing Solutions, comScore)

on by in Advertising, Announcements, Interviews, News


We are thrilled to reveal that season two of the Emmy®-nominated Hulu Original Behind the Mask will feature one of the team’s most valuable players, the San Francisco Giants mascot, “Lou Seal” – among three more mascots who will uncover what it’s really like to balance real life between the pressures of game day.

Set to debut in February 2015, the hit docu-series will tell the story of four real-life mascots: the veteran Major League Baseball mascot, “Lou Seal”; a freelance mascot performer with autism whose many gigs range from “The Easter Bunny” to “Bucky the Blood Drop”; the show’s first female performer, Gilbert Arizona High School mascot “The Tiger”; and minor league hockey mascot “Tux” of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins, who returns from season one to continue his lifelong dream of going professional.

In its first season, Behind the Mask won over audiences and critics alike through the captivating stories its real-life cast of characters had to share, each with their own personal stories of juggling their everyday lives with their larger-than-life mascot personas. The Los Angeles Times called the series a “a triumph of storytelling,” while Forbes magazine described it as “an example of online content that doesn’t just match the quality of regular television and cable programing, it surpasses it.” NPR simply dubbed it “amazingly gripping television.”


About the Season 2 Mascots:



Joel, dubbed the Cal Ripken of mascots, has never missed a single game in his 15 years as the ever-popular “Lou Seal,” and dreams of his team winning another World Series. He is married, with one 2-year-old daughter and a second one on the way. This season, Joel will need to find a balance between his two most important commitments: keeping his attendance streak as “Lou Seal,” and being the best father he can be to his children.



Chris is a 25 year-old freelance mascot who struggles with his autism and severe anxiety. His passion for the job is in no small part due to the fact that Chris finds inner strength and confidence when inside a mascot suit, a mask that minimizes eye contact and removes the expectation that he has to speak. Chris’ mother and father are instrumental in his life and Behind the Mask will take viewers on Chris’ emotional journey as he relishes in the small victories and progresses towards real growth and independence, one suit at a time.



The first female mascot to appear on the show, Navey is the embodiment of her “Tiger” character – fierce, confident and the king of her jungle: Gilbert High School. This season, she is competing to become the National High School Mascot of the Year and has her sights set on becoming a pro-mascot when she grows up. Navey is a tomboy with a sparkling personality, a zest for life and an absolute love of all things Gilbert High Athletics. While incredibly athletic herself, she chose to become a mascot so she could be on every field and every court and be a meaningful part of all teams at her high school.



Returning from Season 1, Chad is giving it one last shot to make it to the pros. In his efforts to become a professional mascot, he’s sacrificed a great deal, including moving away from Canada and his teenage son Cody, whom he rarely gets to see. Chad wonders if he’s been selfish by chasing his dreams and constantly struggles with the inner turmoil revolving around his family and his pursuit of his own goals.

on by in Advertising, Interviews

Nick Kroll’s been a bro, a cartoon, a female publicist, an Ed Hardy boy, and a stand-up comic. He’s now all of those things, especially that last one, on his own show, Kroll Show.

Kroll Show premieres January 16 on Comedy Central, and you can catch the pilot on Hulu right now.

We decided to talk to Kroll about the whole thing, but here’s a quick primer on a few of the characters you’ll be seeing, before we get started.

Kroll and Jon Daly play Rich Dicks Aspen Bruckheimer and Wendy Shawn.

“Basically leisure has bred all the masculinity out of them,” Kroll says.

Then there’s Bobby Bottleservice—one of the Ed Hardy Boyz, along with a guy named Peter Paparazzo (also played by Jon Daly). The duo solves mysteries, gets girls, and of course, rocks Ed Hardy.

There’s also Liz G, a college graduate who expects the best. She’s the driven one, and her business partner, Liz B. (played by Jenny Slate) is trying to have a life. Together, they run a PR firm called PubLIZity. You’re not going to believe this, but it’s based off of their names.

Then there’s Kroll himself, but we’ll let him explain that.

Hulu: So what’s the show gonna look like?

NK: “A hybrid of sketch and longer-format story-telling. It feels more like you’re watching a collection of mini-series that is very character and story driven more than a classic sketch driven.”

Hulu: What’s first?

NK: A little bit of me as me, talking directly to camera, to get a little of the standup out and give the audience a little sense of who I am.

Hulu: Then?

NK: A bunch of characters. They’re all kinda like loveable losers in some capacity.

Hulu: What was it like playing Stu on “The Life and Times of Tim?”

NK: (Show creator) Steve (Dildarian) had established the character, I just auditioned over the phone for that while I was still living in New York. It’s collaborative in that, like “The League,” there are scripts but a ton of room for improv. So, both with Ruxin (on “The League”) and Stu, the creators did a very nice job of establishing the kind of person they are. Then, through collaborating on writing and improvising in the room I was able to add various layers that seemed funny to me to each character.

I love doing animation stuff. One, it’s incredibly easy. It’s really easy to do in that you don’t have to put on makeup or dress nicely or anything but also you can mess around and find new angles and you’re not wasting anybody’s time. Hopefully, if we do Season 2 of Kroll Show, we would be able to tinker around with some animation.

And doing ”The Life and Times of Tim,” I actually met John Levenstein, who ran the show in Season 2. He ended up as one of the executive producers and showrunner for Kroll Show.

Hulu: So tell me a little bit about “The League” season finale.

NK: All I can say is that there will be some very shocking, shocking occurrences that will…I can guarantee there will be some surprises and I can also guarantee that everyone will be miserable.

Hulu: And how’s the show going overall?

NK: The show obviously has resonated and people seem psyched about it. I can just sense that people are enjoying it.

(Note: The day after our interview the season finale premiered. It was indeed very shocking. And FX announced that the show was picked up for a 5th season.)

Hulu: What’re you watching these days?

NK: I do a lot of what I like to call TV tapas, which is flipping through shows for five to ten minutes at a time. I’ll watch five minutes of “Duck Dynasty” and five minutes of a Korean soap opera and then five minutes of “SportsCenter” and then five minutes of Junior, the movie. I’m watching Season 2 of “Breaking Bad” now. I need to catch up with this whole season of “Homeland.” I watch “Parks and Rec.” I enjoy the Steve Brule show (“Check It Out! With Dr. Steve Brule”). Beyond all my friends’ shows, which I watch, which are like Paul Scheer’s NTSF on Adult Swim (“NTSF:SD:SUV”) and “Childrens Hospital,” I like “American Masters” on PBS a lot. I grew up watching SNL I still watch a good amount of it. I’ll go to Hulu, actually, and watch it.

Want more of Nick Kroll? See him discuss “Kroll Show” and “The League” with buddy and “The League” costar Paul Scheer here.